Fall Newsletter Preview! Welcome our newest coordinator!

The SIA Fall & Winter 2015 Newsletter is ready for your reading enjoyment!

Read exciting stories and see photos from our programs:

  • Welcome Hastings, our newest Small Business Fund Coordinator in Malawi!
  • Mirriam’s story of transformation from poverty to stability in Zambia.
  • Student scholarships have a big impact at Samro School in Kenya.
  • “A Life of Wholeness” – Inspiration from Del Anderson

You can download the newsletter as a PDF document (4 MB) or read it online.

With joy and gratitude,
Tanya

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A boy in Manyamula Village, Malawi with bags of dried corn maize.

Food photos: ABCs of Ugandan cuisine

Food photos: ABCs of Ugandan cuisine

The internet is filled with photos of people’s meals. To contribute to the global table I’m adding 5 (technically 6, if you include the top photo of bananas) photos of things I ate in Uganda while visiting the Small Business Fund groups there last summer!

Amaranth – Amaranth is a grain that is fighting malnutrition in Uganda. It is high in protein and also has essential fatty acids and micronutrients. We had it ground together with peanuts to make a tasty peanut sauce. Peanuts are called “groundnuts” in Uganda, Kenya, and Malawi. These amaranth seeds were growing in one of the kitchen gardens we visited.

amaranth seeds in Uganda

 

Bread & Chickens – The Yuba family shows us that they have enough food – good bread and chicken – from their pottery and kiosk business successes. We ate the chicken for dinner and had the bread with jam and butter in the mornings and with tea in the evenings. I grew up with chickens in the backyard and so luckily I knew how to hold a chicken when it was given to me!

The Yuba family shows us that they have enough food - good bread and chicken - from their pottery and kiosk business successes. (Kasozi, Uganda)

 

Corn & Groundnuts – The local savings and loans group in Kasozi generously gave us bags of red beans and corn (maize). The corn was ground and cooked into ugali, which is one of the staple foods and is like a denser polenta. The other Small Business Fund (SBF) Coordinators took the groundnuts (peanuts) home to share with their families or SBF groups in their communities. In the photo below, SBF Coordinator from Kasozi, Godfrey Matovu, receives the gift.

gift of beans and corn in Uganda

 

Coffee – Did you know that coffee grows on trees? One of the Small Business Fund families we visited in Kasozi, Uganda also grew coffee trees. Boyd – the coffee lover in our family – was excited to see them growing. However, we only had black tea and instant coffee for our tea times; the coffee all gets shipped elsewhere.

coffee in uganda

 

Samosas – also called Sambusas don’t fit in the theme of food starting with the letters A, B, or C; it was something we ate though! The bean-filled samosas were prepared by a mother and son. He rolled out the dough nice and thin and then she filled them and fried them in a pan of hot oil. Tasty!

boy makes samosas in uganda

A time to renew our shared vision

A time to renew our shared vision

“A time to renew our shared vision of working in the community so as to achieve a greater impact in alleviating poverty, and also share success stories!”

Wambui Nguyo, Small Business Fund Coordinator in Nairobi, Kenya, offered the above tagline summary of our Small Business Fund Coordinator Conference in Kasozi Village last July. We traveled from five different countries (United States, Malawi, Kenya, Nigeria, and our two hosts in Uganda), arriving at the end of a small dusty, dirt road to met for three days to discuss all things Small Business Fund.

Uganda is quite a bit more tropical compared with Kenya and Malawi, so we shed our warm sweaters (which we necessary in the cold Nairobi rain) and brought out the sun hats and gathered under a pop-up awning for our morning meetings and evening check-ins.

Our conference meeting room in tropical Uganda!

Our conference meeting room in tropical Uganda!

Our Coordinators range from 12 years to less than 1 year experience with our program and so that sharing between coordinators was rich and welcome. I also had chances to share my thoughts and experiences from the office side of things.

“I met with veteran coordinators of SBF who had a lot of successful stories,” Wambui wrote after the conference. “Just listening to them on how they try to conduct their training is something that I will take back with me. There is need to mentor the groups more before giving the initial $100.”

A Focus on Sustainability

One of our most vibrant discussions was about how to coach groups about conducting their new business with an eye toward sustainability; focusing on the long-term, rather than short-term activities that will leave the family in the same state of poverty. Ofonime Nkoko, SIA SBF Coordinator in Abak, Nigeria also highlighted how he will focus more on mentoring, “This training is very helpful to me. The areas to be noted most are: the mindset preparation; the need and the right time to give out the money; the demand, investment, reinvestment, sustainably, and Share the Gift theory.

Sharing the Gift

Seeing how the SBF program is implemented in each unique community situation (rural or city, in different countries) was part of the fullness of the conversation. “It was helpful to know there are several ways of Sharing the Gift e.g. mentoring, training others on certain skills, etc.” wrote Wambui, the newest coordinator in attendance.

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Wambui and Canaan during a tea break between conference sessions.

Canaan, whose community in Malawi has a thriving culture of Sharing the Gift for SIA participants reflected, “I learned how Sharing the Gift implementation can spur more community empowerment and development.”

Dennis Kiprop, SBF Coordinator in Eldoret, Kenya captured the enthusiasm of the group and our willingness to learn from each other in his evaluation, “The time at the conference was good. The discussions in the mornings as a team were especially helpful and encouraging. I learned from the other coordinators and from Tanya and Boyd to be effective coordinator in creating sustainable business groups to the point of Sharing the Gift. We can do it better in the future as coordinators!

Acting our faith – Welcoming the immigrant

Acting our faith – Welcoming the immigrant

This week, with all the news about refugees and migrants running from dangerous situations and lured by hope, we have an extraordinary opportunity to put our spirit into action.

I have been heart-wrenched after hearing about the monumental journey that families are deciding to take, either together or apart, to search for that hope and that peace that is our right. Sadness and death are all around. Fear keeps people from reaching out a hand.

And yet, there are also promising stories of radical acceptance, of people welcoming strangers, giving encouraging words and nourishing food. Churches and secular communities are coming together saying, “We must do something. We must act to make the world better NOW.” And they are finding ways to act, by pressuring governments to accept more refugees and even sponsoring families to come to live in safety.

Welcoming the Stranger

This act of making space for, and welcoming the stranger, is core to my faith. Three years ago I came to appreciate this on a deeper level. (Reposted from my 2013 blog post):

“It surprised me just how much is in the Bible about the stranger. For example, “When immigrants live in your land with you, you must not cheat them. Any immigrant who lives with you must be treated as if they were one of your citizens. You must love them as yourself, because you were immigrants in the land of Egypt; I am the LORD your God” (Leviticus 19:33-34). Over and over again, the Bible makes it pretty clear: treat people fairly, no matter where they come from; welcome them, because you never know when you might find yourself in need of hospitality.

Hospitality builds community, in part, because it is a gift to both the giver and receiver. “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares” (Hebrews 13:2). Both the host and the hosted have the opportunity to meet angels. [blog link]. Eight months ago I came to Canada – an immigrant – and I’ve received so much of the generous hospitality to newcomers. But just last week I was able to help a woman in the grocery store find what she needed, “I’m new in town,” she said by way of explanation. And so, I helped her, because I once was the newest newcomer. Plus, who knows, she might be an angel.”

“respect myself and my brothers and my sisters
”

In the coming weeks may we get down to pray and then get up off our knees and act to show our true respect for those members of our global family who are courageous enough to leave what they know to seek a better future.

Am I young enough to believe in revolution
Am I strong enough to get on my knees and pray
Am I high enough on the chain of evolution
To respect myself and my brothers and my sisters
And perfect myself in my own peculiar way.
~Kris Kristoferson, from Pilgrim’s Progress

Why give internationally?

Why give internationally?

When I put out a call for blog posts that people would like me to write, I got this suggestion:

Q: “I would like a post about “Why Africa?” So many of my friends say they want to support causes close to home, so are less inclined to support causes around the globe. Can you speak to that? I know you have insight about this.”

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A: Thanks for the great question! My reasons for giving internationally fall around five key considerations:

  1. Your money can have a much larger impact internationally.

SIA’s Small Business Grants of $150 can help a family in Malawi or Kenya start a small enterprise. In order to start any business in the U.S. you’d need a much larger investment. Similarly, a small amount spent internationally on de-worming pills can significantly improve a child’s life, whereas the same amount wouldn’t have the same affect on long-term quality of life in the U.S.. Our dollar has much greater purchasing power in so many African countries.

 

  1. Simply greater need internationally.

Many developing countries have much less government and social support available. There is a lot of infrastructure and also individual rights that we can take for granted in the U.S.. Most people in the U.S. don’t face the same barriers to accessing basic financial services or medical care that are the norm for a majority of people in Uganda. Many parts of Malawi do not have running water or electricity. Those are basic things that are so well-established in the U.S. that we can forget that they are there. Giving internationally can help people access things that we don’t even realize we already have.

 

  1. Expanding my community and connecting with the larger world.

While giving locally can help people I see around me, I think it is also important to give to those who are beyond my scope of vision and who still need help. There are levels of poverty and violence that are so much greater than anything I see in the U.S. and it is important to remember them even when I can’t see them. Giving internationally, and learning about international issues, helps me to connect with the global community and form a greater understanding of the varied experiences of living on earth that are so different from my own.

 

  1. To right historic wrongs.

This might be a more controversial consideration but I do think it is important to recall that British, American, and other colonial projects have had massive, lasting, negative impacts on the lives of people in the colonized countries. The U.S. benefited greatly over many generations on the backs of slaves from Africa, as well as minerals and natural resources taken from African countries. Giving internationally can be a way to recognize that history and privilege, and to work for a better future.

 

  1. Finally, in seeking a balance between local and international giving, consider how you can give differently for each need.

It is much more effective to volunteer and give goods locally than internationally. Travel expenses and shipping costs can add up to significant amounts of money without helping those in need. Similarly, you can be a greater advocate to your local government or for societal change in your own community than attempting those same tasks in a culture where you are an outsider. Consider the old adage “think globally, act locally.” I’d add that while thinking globally, also give globally! Money travels easily around the globe and (see #1) can have an enormous impact in countries where people are living off only $1-5 dollars a day.

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Ultimately, I hope that you will all find both local and international causes that inspire you to give.

If you have other questions or topics on which you’d like me to reflect, let me know in the comments or in an email!

Give to SIA’s international programs now!

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