5 things: Giving

5 things: Giving

A story of Giving

Last summer, when packing for my trip to Africa, I added a few gifts for the many people who would host me. Some were designated gifts and others (a few deflated soccer balls and two bike lights) were for spur of the moment gifts. One evening in Malawi our meeting with the local host team went late. It was long past sunset when Matthews hopped on his bike to ride home. There are no street lights in Manyamula Village and the moon was new. Suddenly I remembered the bike lights. “Wait!” I called and ran to my room. I brought out the light and attached it to Matthews’ handlebars. Everyone stood back to admire the bright LED light. Matthews clapped and gave me a hug. As he rode off, the light cast a satisfying glow on the dusty road. It was the perfect gift and the perfect moment!

The Joy of Giving

“There are some things that science says make us feel good. … And, counterintuitively in our individualistic culture, giving to others is one of those things.” (I can’t find the source for this quote.)

Sharing the Gift in Uganda

Rehema gives a package of groundnuts to Tanya as a gift. Rehema sells second hand clothes along the main road. She adopted 4 orhpans, 1 boy and 3 girls, into her family. (Kasozi Village, Uganda)

Rehema gives a package of groundnuts (peanuts) to Tanya as a gift. Rehema, received a Small Business Fund grant and now sells second hand clothes along the main road. She adopted 4 orhpans, 1 boy and 3 girls, into her family. (Kasozi Village, Uganda)

The Gift of Music

A body-moving, soul-filling song from the bank Songhoy Blues, from Mali. For a time, music was banned in northern Mali. This group wrote this song, during the ban, from another part of Mali.

Giving the Gift of Giving

A blog post from 2011 describing our Sharing the Gift pay-it-forward program. “The Small Business Fund and Sharing the Gift enables people who have grown up with very little to have enough to share with others and to be respected for their gifts to neighbors.”

Wisdom from Del: Co-creators with the Divine

Wisdom from Del: Co-creators with the Divine

“God will not do for us what we can do for ourselves.  We are not created as puppets to be manipulated and controlled.  The Holy One does not force us to make certain decisions or to take specific actions, but honors us as co-workers and gives us free will.

We are created as junior-partners, ambassadors, and co-creators with the Almighty.  The work is not complete until we fulfill God’s divine plan and destiny in our lives by expressing and manifesting “God’s kingdom here on earth as it is in heaven.”

As we pray, listen, hear and act, we receive the abundant life; all the good our Father/Mother God has already provided (created) for us, and whose “good pleasure it is to give us the kingdom.”

Let us fulfill God’s divine plan for us. Let us pray, listen and work, resting in the Holy One, waiting confidently and expectantly, alert and doing our part. Thus we discover that we are God’s answer to the needs of humankind.

It is our joy, privilege and responsibility to transform God’s dream for us into a working, living reality.

You are greater than you know. You are of more value to God than you believe possible.

Let us believe enough to act, to start now on a holy journey of love and faith, obeying our Lord Jesus’ commands, “Feed the hungry” and “Only believe (and act as though you believe) and you shall see the glory of God” manifested in and through you.”

Ruth shows us one of the mats she's made to sell. Before the Small Business Fund grant the family was just subsistence farming, now their farm has grown so that they have enough to sell. (Uganda)

Ruth shows us one of the mats she’s made to sell. Before the Small Business Fund grant the family was just subsistence farming, now their farm has grown so that they have enough to sell. (Uganda)

For more from Del Anderson, see Del’s Writings. Join the Del Anderson Legacy Circle by becoming a monthly/quarterly SIA supporter.

Pre-school students celebrate Easter in Malawi

Pre-school students celebrate Easter in Malawi

A year ago, the first preschool in Manyamula village was started with a Small Business Fund grant. Nellie, newly divorced, moved to Manyamula to start a new life. Nellie and two assistants – Deliwe and Tamara – each already had teaching skills and they were eager to help the 30 new students learn and grow. With the Small Business Fund grant they were able to purchase some books, crayons, mats, and cups for snack time. Thus was born the First Steps Pre-School.

The pre-school has already grown to 50 students and has created a ripple of business activity in town. Mary Phiri, who owns one of the shops in the market, has enrolled her youngest daughter in the pre-school, allowing her to concentrate her efforts of building her grocery business. And Chimwemwe, another shop owner and knitter, received a commission from the school to knit sweater uniforms for some of the students.

Children from the local SBF-supported school told us what they wanted to be when they grew up: a nurse; teacher; poilot.

Children from the local SBF-supported school told us what they wanted to be when they grew up: a nurse; teacher; pilot.

Recently the students, ages 1-4, put together an Easter pageant for the community called “Time to Come Together.” Nellie said that, “it has been my passion to organize such an auspicious occasion for the school so that children can share their experiences together and enjoy the love of God.”

The children sang, recited Bible verses, and danced together. Several community members gave speeches to encourage the children and thank them for putting together this new kind of event in Manyamula. Nellie was extremely happy to have the students appreciated by the community and was quick to say, “It is beautiful for our children of different churches to come together. This will strengthen their social structures and spiritual growth!”

Nellie, Canaan Gondwe, and Tanya with puzzles and toys from Tanya's nieces.

Nellie, Canaan Gondwe, and Tanya with puzzles and toys from Tanya’s nieces.

Success Story: “Darkness is cured”

Success Story: “Darkness is cured”

Back in October 2012 I shared the success story of Hastings and Ruth Fuvu in Malawi. They had received a $150 Small Business Fund grant in early 2012, ramping up their business of selling tomatoes and onions in the market. This expanded business increased the family income enough to buy school uniforms for their children and seek medical attention for their daughter Miness, who experiences periodic seizures. The 2012 post ended with Fuvu’s dream to build a house of their own, using burnt bricks.

Malawi, bricks

Hastings and Ruth with bricks for their house. (2012)

Well, in July, 2014, I got to visit that new house! We sat in their home, listening to their story of how their lives have improved since growing their business: “We have wealthy relatives,” Ruth told us, “and they have never given to us, but SIA has given to us.”

This week I received another exciting update from Canaan Gondwe, the SIA Small Business Fund Coordinator in Manyamula: Hastings and Ruth have been able to connect to the new electrical grid.

Canaan reports:

“After making enough savings, they molded bricks, built a house and now they have electrified the house. One part of the building they are using it as a barbershop where they get the additional income. With the same power, they are renting to someone who is welding at the premises. This is an income diversification for the family.

The Fuvu home with electricity! A welder pays to tap into the electricity. Welding has been only available with generators before the grid came to the village.

The Fuvu home with electricity! A welder pays to tap into the electricity. Welding has been only available with generators before the grid came to the village.

“The family was quick to tell me that very soon they are Sharing the Gift by assisting one person to begin as they began.

“Life is new because they no longer go for fuel to light up their house. Life is made easy as darkness is simply cured up with pressing the ‘on’ switch in the house.

Imagine such a difference in just three years! This $150 small grant is continuing to pay amazing dividends to the Fuvus and others in the community.

Malawi, house, home

Tanya in front of the guest room of the Fuvu family’s new home. They invited me to “take a sleep” at their house next time we visit!

I want a Kenyan cell phone!

I want a Kenyan cell phone!

When you think Africa you might not think cell phones. You should though! In Kenya especially they are doing some really cool, innovative things with cell phones. In fact, there are a few ways I wish my North American cell phone service could be more like the Kenyan system…

Maureen Kasadi in Nairobi texts with a friend before our Small Business Fund meeting starts.

Maureen Kasadi in Nairobi texts with a friend before our Small Business Fund meeting starts.

1. Cheaper service

Have you noticed how expensive cell phone plans are in the US? Of course you have! Even the “pay as you go” plans can have $10/month minimums. In 2013, 70% of Kenyans had cell phones. Once you purchase the phone in Kenya, you can buy of “air time” to “top up” your account balance. Unlike the US, these airtime minutes are sold in increments of about 50 cents to $20.

The Kenyan system is truly pay as you go. If you can only afford 50 cents of airtime you can buy just the amount needed for that one important call. In the US it seems that monthly minimums keeps rising, giving me much more than I need each month.

2. Sending money

A banking revolution is happening in Kenya – and it’s happening because of cell phones. About 70% of Kenyans do not have access to a bank. They DO have cell phones though. Enter M-Pesa! M-Pesa allows people to transfer money through their cell phones.

The sender brings money directly to an M-Pesa dealer (which operate out of city grocery stores and the tiniest rural kiosks) and gives the dealer the cell phone number of the receiver. Then the receiver gets a text saying the money is available. They go to their local M-Pesa dealer and pick up the cash! Whereas before a daughter working in the city might’ve had to travel hours by bus to bring cash to her parents in the country, now she can transfer it instantly to them.

We are even using M-Pesa for SIA! We can make one bank transfer to Kenya and then have the Small Business Fund coordinators M-Pesa the money to each other. Each bank transfer costs us $10. Each M-Pesa transfer costs just $2-3.

Grace's shop in the Manyamula Market is connected to the new electricity lines in town and so she provides phone charging services for a small fee.

Grace’s shop in the Manyamula Market is connected to the new electricity lines in town and she provides phone charging services for a small fee.

3. Shopping around

Most Kenyans have non-smart phones – phones for texting and calling, rather than easy internet use – and most have space for two different SIM cards. This means they can switch between cell phone carriers as suits their needs. Airtel, Orange, and Safaricom are the three most popular carriers and each have different deals and rates for different times. When you have both an Airtel and a Safaricom SIM card, you can shift to use whichever has cheaper evening calls or cheaper calls within the carrier network. This flexibility seems like a dream for those of us locked into one carrier based on the phone or a 2-year contract!

Bonus: Sharing opportunities

As I blogged about last week, people are excited about electricity coming to Manyamula, Malawi. So far, just a few shops have access to the electrical wires, and others are using solar power. Both are highly valued because electricity is necessary to charge all these cell phones! When we visited Winkly Mahowe he showed us his solar panel connected to a power strip, where he allows neighbors to charge their cell phones for free. Charging is also a viable SBF business- we saw this crowded power source in one of the Manyamula market shops.

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