Living my values through SIA

I apologize that the music videos didn’t show up in the email last week. If you want to watch them, click here!

“I believe that the whole world about me is full of beauty, joy and power, even as it is full of God, and that I can share it and enjoy it if I attune myself to my Divine Plan and am inwardly open toward God and outwardly helpful toward [others].”   ~ Glenn Clark, The Divine Plan

I have a tendency to get caught up in the details of work. I’m an organizer and I like to plan next steps, moving from task to task. And sometimes I lose sight of the bigger picture. When I read the quote above by Glenn Clark, I was jolted back into considering how all the work I do for Spirit in Action is part of my fuller life. It’s inseparable from all other parts of my life.

The quote captures it perfectly. I have been blessed to see a world of hope, beauty, goodness, and possibility around me. And when I stop to be grateful I am reminded to thank God (“inwardly open toward God”) and share this vision and hope with others (“outwardly helpful toward others”).

I love this movie poster like photo! Can you tell we mean business? Slyvestor, Canaan Gondwe, Winkly Mahowe, walking with me down the dusty road in Manyamula on the way to our site visits.

I love this movie poster like photo! Can you tell we mean business? Slyvestor, Canaan Gondwe, Winkly Mahowe, walking with me down the dusty road in Manyamula on the way to our site visits.

Values at work

“How did you get into this work?” a student at Illinois College asked me after I presented about SIA. As in, how does one come to want to work for a non-profit?

When I started working for SIA six years ago (2016 update: now 9 years ago!) I had just left my job at an insurance company. It was after the switch that I realized the importance (for me) of working for an organization that has emotions, learning, and faith built into its very fabric. At SIA, those things I value most – including the desire to spread goodness – won’t be pushed aside.

This alignment of values and work doesn’t only happen in nonproft organizations. I can trace my desire for passionate work to my artist parents and my professor husband. When the sole focus isn’t on profit organizations, universities, and businesses can afford to spend more time focused on people and relationships.

Giving Nellie, who started a school in Manyamula with a Small Business Fund grant, some puzzles from my nieces.

Giving Nellie, who started a school in Manyamula with a Small Business Fund grant, some puzzles from my nieces.

Job+ throughout SIA

I’m not the only one at SIA who feels and knows this job+ concept. Our inward/outward vision is also built into the Small Business Fund program.

The families that receive our $150 grants also receive emotional and practical support from the local SBF coordinators. In line with Glenn Clark’s vision for a good life, each is encouraged on their individual spiritual journey (“inwardly open toward God”) and asked to pay-it-forward through Sharing the Gift (“outwardly helpful toward others”).

Working together with so many people to improve ourselves and serve those around us is a blessing that is more than just work. Thank you for joining me in this good, full life.

This was previously published on the SIA blog on February 11, 2014.

See what a Kenyan viral video looks like!

See what a Kenyan viral video looks like!

You never know what video or meme might go viral. Sometimes it’s dumping a bucket of ice water on your head. Sometimes it’s an adorable baby sea otter. And in Kenya, sometimes it’s a street boy singing a popular gospel song!

Tredy Bradly was filmed singing a song by the famous Kenyan gospel singer, Mercy Masika. It was uploaded to Facebook and people loved it! “What talent!” they gushed. Soon there was a campaign to get Mercy to recognize the boy. Then he was adopted by a Kenyan guardian and has earned a full scholarship to a private school in Nairobi!

See what all the fuss is about:

Now enjoy the original song, watched over 3 million times (including 3 times by me…)!

This “urban gospel” song is a song of love and praise to God. The chorus says,

“And I cant’ keep myself from speaking of your goodness.
And it is not bragging, you have done me well.”

Amen.

South Sudanese Refugees

In more sober news from East Africa the number of of refugees fleeing the violence in South Sudan has reached 1 million this week, according to the UN. After a ceasefire in South Sudan in 2015, there was a renewed round of fighting in the capital this July. The refugees, mostly women and children, are seeking asylum in Uganda, Ethiopia, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Central African Republic. Uganda is now generously hosting more refugees than in any time in their history, including about 370,000 South Sudanese.

Here is a short news story with more details.

Let us be prayerful for the refugees, those welcoming them, and those still fighting for power. May there be peace in South Sudan. May we find more space for compassion in this world. Let there be peace on earth, and let it begin with me.

Training boys to be allies

Training boys to be allies

This seminar was different. Boys and girls sat in the classroom together. Listening to the presentations about puberty, reproductive health, and HIV/AIDS together. Spirit in Action grants have supported girls’ empowerment seminars and an alternative rite of passage at CIFORD Kenya and Pastoralist Child Foundation in the past. However, this seminar was the first to include high schoolers of both sexes.

ciford_girls_boys_seminar_8-16 The co-ed seminar came at the request of the parents and the youth in Meru, Kenya. The girls felt strongly that the boys also needed to learn about sexuality and the fight against genital cutting. “The participants were happy and said they are going to be change agents in the community to fight against female circumcision,” reported one of the facilitators.

Eighty participants (35 boys and 45 girls) attended the week-long seminar held during the August school holidays. The facilitators are local women, who are experienced in health education. In addition to covering the health problems and danger of female circumcision, the sessions also discussed the effects of texting and social media, career and talent development, and drug and substance abuse. There was time for focus group discussion and questions from the youth.  “It was a learning experience. And since it was the first of its kind we had to consult a lot,” said Margaret Ikiara, Director of the grassroots organization CIFORD Kenya.
ciford_girls_boys_seminar_group_8-16

This is an opportunity for our children to be told those things which we cannot share with them,” said Kambura, a mother of one of the girls. “My daughter is very happy. She says she learned a lot that she will share with her friends who were unable to attend.”

Each participant left with a shirt that says, “The future depends on us. We are the change.” Together they will bring the message to friends and family members, and be visible in the community as standing up for girl’s rights.

"The future depends on us. We are the change." Proclaim the seminar t-shirts.

“The future depends on us. We are the change.” Proclaim the seminar t-shirts.

The participants had a great suggestion for future seminars: How about including a talent contest? Let’s make this fun, in addition to informative and empowering!

Gratitude from Margaret, Director of CIFORD:

“On behalf of our community and the benefiting boys and girls, and on behalf of CIFORD, I wish to thank the SIA donors and the SIA board for approving this exciting program. Thank you to Tanya for being there for us and giving encouraging words. We say a big thank you.”

Dear Friend: A Letter From Del

Dear Friend: A Letter From Del

A letter from Del Anderson:

Dear friend,

I can only look at my own journey to see how sure I was that my way was The Way. I look back with sorrow at my Christian beliefs that helped me to say, “Jesus is Lord,” but did little to allow Jesus to live my life. I feel very grateful and humble as I remember the days of ecstasy, my first experiencing, feeling, and knowing my Lord as my living Savior. Yet the experience was tinged and eventually dimmed by my belief that it was my responsibility to see that everyone else find my living Jesus with exactly the same beliefs and experience. I wanted them to use the same words I did. I felt I had an exclusive hot-line with Jesus and that He was telling me how to lead everyone else to exactly the same experience, in precisely the same way.

del_deskI did not put my trust and dependency in my Christ, who is anyone’s Savior. I did not trust Jesus as Holy Spirit to stir, quicken, lead and change within the lives of my family and friends. I failed to see that if I really trusted Jesus and gave myself as a living sacrifice to Him, accepting others in His Love and depending upon Him in His Time and Way to bring forth Himself, that this abiding and resting in Him, this looking, loving, longing to be like Him, would allow Him to accomplish His Purposes.

This egocentricity, this desire to play God, kept me from being one with Jesus and helped to separate me from other folks and even turned some precious children of God away from God.

I believe that Jesus accepted everyone where they were (and are). He loved them to their next higher step in the unfolding process of Spirit, in their pilgrimage from sense to soul, from the outer to the Inner, from self to Christ.

I believe Jesus is saying to me, “Love, love, love. Let Me live your life. Abide and rest in My Nature, My Character, My Spirit. Give Me your full attention and I will bring you into an experiencing, knowing Oneness with Me. Let Me really take over your life. Let each person plant, water and cultivate to the highest they can now accept and aspire. I love you and I love them. I need you and I need them. Do not build walls of separation. I, Jesus, am the Way, the Truth, the Life. No one can change or gain save this. I do not need your protection or ability. I AM. I only need your availability. Come! Follow Me! Don’t let your intellectual beliefs and differences separate you from one of My children. Keep your eyes on Me. I am truly your Lord, indeed!”

One with you in His Love,
Del

Doing Good…Says Who? A book review

Doing Good…Says Who? A book review

It’s rare that a book about international aid and charity reflects Spirit in Action’s core philosophy of partnership and responding to the needs of the community. (In fact, that’s why I’m working on a book of collected essays about the importance of small grants and true partnership. More details to come!)

When I read Doing Good..Says Who? by Connie Newton and Fran Early, I immediately recommended it to all of SIA’s Board members. This book, which came out of interviews with 430 Guatemalans and non-Guatemalan aid workers and volunteers, features stories that clearly demonstrate the importance of listening to community members and trusting local knowledge. I came away more sure than ever that that is the only way to create lasting change. And it’s also an enjoyable, non-technical read!

The book is organized in five chapters, each focusing on a principle that is, “at the heart of guiding good intentions into productive outcomes.” Overall, good intentions are nice, but they are definitely not enough to ensure the desired outcome!

Respect and value people.

The people in poverty described poverty in terms of powerlessness and voicelessness. In a poignant moment in this chapter, a donor marvels at how their project is like a three-legged stool. The donors raise money in the US. A program director in Guatemala runs the organization and communicates with donors. A woman from the area manages the school lunch program site. A sturdy stool. Then the local woman points out that the donor missed the fourth leg of the stool. The stool would not stand without the mothers who are cooking and making the program happen every day. And it is the mothers who know how to face and overcome the challenges on the ground.

Build trust through relationships.

A woman from the US goes to a remote village to establish a clinic. How successful do you think she is going to be on her own? She quickly realizes that she will only be able to provide help if she is ready to learn, respond to local customs, and work on local time. Her focus becomes, “how can I build their trust?”

When medical volunteers come from the US, she makes sure they also understand the important of trust. The trip is not just about North Americans giving to poor people, it was about a relationship of exchange where they all are students as well as teachers.

Building relationships. COMSIP Sharp! Tanya and Boyd met with the leaders of the national COMSIP organization in Malawi's capital city. We met to share our support of the Manyamula COMSIP Cooperative.

Building relationships. COMSIP Sharp! Tanya and Boyd met with the leaders of the national COMSIP organization in Malawi’s capital city. We met to share our support of the Manyamula COMSIP Cooperative.

Do “with” rather than “for.”

“Never do for someone what they can do for themselves.” A group of philanthropists want to help people in Guatemala. Once they get there, they realize that they don’t know the first thing about how to invest in real change! There are a lot of potential negative consequences to giving money without understanding the larger systems in play. I love the stories in this chapter as the group makes a tour of several grassroots organizations. They see that the local organizations are able to challenge the inequalities in their system. This will do more in the long-run than a handout that only covers over the inequality.

"The

Ensure feedback and accountability.
Evaluate every step of the way.

“I wish those human factors could show up on our spreadsheets,” laments an organizer of a microfinance group. They are getting pressure from donors to keep the program numbers growing. And this means that there is no time to really build relationships and establish the mutual accountability that is key to the group-backed loans.

The last two chapters show that checking in, getting honest feedback from workers on the ground (rather than pushing to match an outsider ideal), and constantly reflecting and trying new tactics will ensure a strong and sustainable program. (Read about our SBF coordinator conferences.)

Let’s Discuss!

The book ends with a discussion guide with some thought-provoking questions. For example: “Think about a time when you had a personal experience of someone doing good for you. What worked? What didn’t? What were your feelings?”

The overall take-away is that programs for lasting change are successful when there is dialog, humility, understanding, flexibility, and a true focus on local leadership. (See the example of the Manyamula COMSIP Cooperative and their locally led micro-loan program.)

I highly recommend the book to you, both in order to understand more clearly the work of our partner organizations and to see the potential pitfalls of only relying on good intentions. I hope, like me, you’ll come away with a renewed appreciation for SIA’s partnership focus. Once you’ve read it, drop me a line and let me know what you thought!

**Click here to buy the book.

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