How to garden in a drought 

How to garden in a drought 

Dispatch from Kenya: 

“The dry season is supposed to be December through March, but this year the rains aren’t coming, even up until now.” This we heard from Joseph Gichioni and so many others in central Kenya. Rahab Mugambi, a member of CIFORD Kenya in Meru County, confirmed that water is their biggest problem.

The rains aren’t coming. Climate change is right there in front of them. In a place where the great majority of people rely on farming for food and livelihood, the lack of water is a serious issue.

So CIFORD Kenya, (whose name stands for Community Initiatives for Rural Development), is working with farmers to make the water that is available last as long as possible. The community-based organization, which we visited over the weekend, has a training garden with various configurations of gardens to reduce water use.


Josephat stands in a “horseshoe” garden. This type of garden channels the water to the center of a group of plants, retaining the water. It also provides space for the farmer to walk into the cluster of plants to easily weed and care for them.

Sunken beds help pool rain water to get the most moisture to the plants.

Margeret Ikiara, director of CIFORD, shows us the “mandala” garden, which has rocks in the center to disperse the water.

Using these methods, farmers are able to successfully maintain “kitchen gardens” – small plots next to the kitchen, mostly for home consumption. They grow staple vegetables like kale (called skuma wiki in Swahili) and tomatoes.

They use water from the trickling streams, from sporadic rains, and from the county-supplied water faucet. However, the faucet only has water one or two days a week, and they never know when that will be dry.


Caption: Rose shows me her maize and beans. She uses the waste water from her kitchen and washing for her garden plot. (Also shown, photographer Mike Hegeman’s thumb!)

Almost every member we talked to over the course of the day stressed how much these gardens had reduced their household expenditures and improved their diet and food security. “We have food all year now, and we don’t even have to buy it at the market anymore. We grow it right here,” said Margaret Karayu (pictured below) proudly as she showed us her verdant garden.

Spirit in Action support for dynamic community organizations like CIFORD help them to find and teach local solutions to the global problem of water scarcity and climate change.

We leave Kenya tomorrow and I return home. This has been such a positive trip and I have met so many wonderful people who are serving their communities and working with unbelievable dedication to change their lives. I have seen women carrying heavy jugs of water long distances, and met passionate teachers and leaders. I can’t wait to share more of what I saw with you…after I get a good night’s sleep in my own bed. Thank you to all who supported this trip and who support the work of SIA. You are so appreciated by all who we met. 

Update from Nairobi, Kenya!

Update from Nairobi, Kenya!

Should we call Korogocho a slum? It’s complicated. The residents in this sector of Nairobi are extremely poor. There is no running water or sewer. People often skip meals and may work full time to earn only $1/day.

But calling it a slum brings up images of desperation, despair, and depravity. And from what I saw yesterday, that is not the mentality of everyone in Korogocho (called Koch for short).

Using the term “informal settlement” as an alternative to slum is perhaps more descriptive. The houses are made of corrugated iron and are built without permits or foundations. They have no address and the whole area could be bulldozed down by the government at any time.


Even in these conditions (or maybe because there is so much need here), the SIA Small Business Fund is thriving in Koch, and people are transforming their lives for the better.

Last weekend, we met with about 15 Small Business Fund grant recipients in a classroom in Koch (pictured above). The group greeted us with celebratory song. They thanks us for the $150 grant which had sparked such change in their life. They clapped and cheered for each other as, one-by-one, they told us their stories of moving from desperation and hopelessness to pride, hope, and self-sufficiency.


“We don’t struggle the way we used to struggle,” said Jamarose Anyango (pictured above), whose second-hand clothing business has enabled her to pay for rent and school fees for her children (plus two orphans she has taken into her care).

Sarah Owendi (pictured below), who sells grains along the roadside, proudly told us that, after starting her business, “now I stand on my own two feet.” She used to wash clothes for $2/week, now she is making enough money from her business to pay the $15/month rent. She also can pay for school fees and has enough to eat.


Caption: Sarah can now earn $10/week from her grocery kiosk, where she sells grains and other staples. 

We heard similar stories over and over. Whereas before people were barely making ends meet day to day, now they are expanding their businesses, reinvesting, and planning for the future.

They are also Sharing the Gift, by passing on the blessing to others. They are encouraging others, training them how to select the shoes that people want to buy, how to run a roadside cafe, and how to sew and tailor clothes.


Caption: Tanya with local mentor Josephine and her daughter, Dorcas, who has trained to me a new SBF Coordinator. 

At our Small Business Fund conference in Malawi last month, we trained another coordinator who will also be working in Koch. Dorcas Okoti lives in Koch (which she calls a slum) and she is well positioned to work with the most desperate families to help them chart a better future for themselves. Dorcas knows the reality of Koch, and also the great potential for entrepreneurship, hope, and change.

Thank you again for all your prayers! We have another week here in Kenya and we’ll be visiting more grant recipeients all over the country!

With faith and gratitude,

Tanya

Grants underway and I’m on my way!

Grants underway and I’m on my way!

We sent out the latest round of grant funds last month and the community projects are already well underway!

Women’s Group Curio Shop

The women of the Namaiyana Women’s Self-Help Group completed their roadside jewelry shop just in time for tourism season! This was the first major construction project undertaken by these women, who are jewelers and members of the Samburu tribe in central Kenya. The first SIA grant was not quite enough to finish the shop and so they asked for a small additional grant to be able to add the final touches. Just a few weeks after receiving the additional $500 grant, the building is ready to go! Look how beautiful it turned out! Supporting these woman was definitely a “smart risk.”

Poultry House Construction

The folks at the Matungu Community Development Charity were eager to get started! Soon after receiving the grant funds they were already hard at work building the new poultry house in western Kenya. Community members worked together to make the bricks and built up the walls. Group leader, Vincent Atitwa wrote, “The poultry house is under construction and in particular we are working hard to lead families and community out of malnutrition and poverty once more.”

They hope that the building will be completed by June 1st. They already have a supplier for the chicks and they will have them delivered soon. The profits from the poultry project will serve as a loan fund for the table banking and low-interest loan program!

I’m on my way!

I leave today for a month-long trip in eastern Africa. After a short vacation, I will meet with all the SIA Small Business Fund partners for a conference and training workshop in Malawi. We will have coordinators from Uganda, Kenya, and Malawi there to discuss and evaluate our program. The manual is printed and ready to be packed!

I’ll try to share my experience with you along the way and post what I can here on the blog, and on Facebook and Instagram. Thank you for your prayers!

A grant that gives hope

A grant that gives hope

Last week, I had the great pleasure of sending out the congratulations letters to the groups that received SIA grants at our last board meeting. I work with each of the grant applicants to more fully understand their projects and to refine their proposals. After weeks and months in communication the happy moment arrives when I get to let them know that SIA approved their application!

“Overwhelmed by joy”

Below is the reply I received from Vincent Atitwa, leader of the Matungu Community Development Charity cooperative in Kenya. They received a grant to start a table banking program to provide their members, mostly small farmers, with low-interest loans.

“First, I must say that I am overwhelmed by joy and happiness after learning that SIA funded our project. I say BIG THANK YOU to you and the entire team of SIA, together with their donors who made all the process possible. May God bless you abundantly so that you continue blessing others too.

“To me, this is not just a grant, it’s a grant that comes with a lot of hope and inspiration to our community.

“Finally God has answered our prayers. I believe that the SIA grant holds a key to unlock a lot of business opportunities for marginalized small scale farmers in our community. The businesses will create both jobs and wealth. I am happy to be associated with SIA and its activities, and I look forward to continuing working with you even in future after this grant.”

A Smart Risk

This grant partnership is a great example of Smart Risk #1 from the forthcoming book, that I co-edited with Jennifer Lentfer, about small grants.

Smart Risk #1: Investing in local expertise. 

Vincent and the rest of the team at Matungu Community Development Charity know the context of lending in rural Kenya. They know about the farming cycles and the challenges associated with the climate and markets. They know the community members and can talk to them when they have trouble repaying the loan. For all these reasons, we believe that it is worth investing in local groups.

Follow along this week on our Facebook page for all five Smart Risks! 

Planning a ribbon cutting ceremony in Malawi

Planning a ribbon cutting ceremony in Malawi

Three years ago, August 2014, I helped the Manyamula Community Savings and Investment Cooperative (COMSIP) in Malawi break ground for their new training centre and office building. This summer – in just seven weeks, to be exact – I’ll be there to commemorate the official opening of the building. And I’ll be staying a few nights in their guest rooms!

“We are planning that as you come to the community, there will be an official opening of the building facility,” shares Canaan Gondwe, leader of the Manyamula COMSIP Cooperative. “You and the other SIA team members will lead the procession and be the Guest of Honour. Traditional leaders, COMSIP Union staff, as well as Government representatives, and all cooperative members will be there to celebrate.”

Tanya at the site of the future Manyamula COMSIP Training Centre, guest house, and office building! (Malawi, 2014)

This ribbon cutting ceremony will kick-off my three-week trip to visit SIA partners in Kenya and Malawi. The days will be filled with visiting Small Business Fund group shops, and homes that have been renovated as a result of business profits. I will be greeting, celebrating successes, and listening to their thoughts on how we can improve our work to have a greater impact.

Trip highlights:

Visit SIA projects in Malawi (3 days)

    1. Manyamula Savings and Loans Group Cooperative
    2. Small Business Fund groups
    3. Youth entrepreneurs in Blantyre

Conference for SIA Small Business Fund Coordinators (4 days)

  1. Program evaluation and peer-to-peer learning
  2. Training for new and potential coordinators

SBF Coordinators canaan Gondwe (Malawi) and Dennis Kiprop (Kenya) at our conference in Uganda in 2014.

Visit SIA projects in Kenya (7 days)

    1. Samuel and Rhoda Teimuge’s Samro School
    2. Small Business Fund groups in Nairobi and Eldoret
    3. CIFORD Kenya (girl’s empowerment)
    4. Megabridge Foundation (piggery)
    5. Dressmaking and beadworking training in informal settlements around Nairobi

Training to Expand 

Over the last two years we have been expanding our SIA Small Business Fund program. We have added new local coordinators in Malawi, Uganda, and two more in Kenya. Families are able to best use these $150 business grants when they are also mentored by our wonderful local coordinators. This means that we are only able to expand the Small Business Fund program as fast as we can find dedicated, reliable coordinators. During my last trip to Africa I realized the need for a more robust training program for recent and incoming coordinators. This time, we will take two days to train new coordinators so that we can ensure our coordinators are ready and prepared to lead and mentor the new business groups.

Tanya and Mike Hegeman leading a song.

Traveling with me will be my wonderful husband, Boyd, and also two very dear friends, Dana Belmonte and Mike Hegeman. Boyd, Dana, and Mike are all SIA Advisory Board members and passionate about our work. Traveling with a group will give me more space for true listening and connection, while leaving the documentation and logistics to our capable team.

If you would like to contribute to the travel fund for the Small Business Fund Coordinators to attend our conference in Malawi, please click here!

 

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