A different way to keep girls in school

A different way to keep girls in school

When we listen to the needs and solutions of the community, instead of providing our own answers, we sometimes hear something we wouldn’t expect. Such was the case of Hope for Relief Organization in northern Malawi. They want to help more girls stay in school and instead of providing new classrooms or school fees, their solution is to provide girls with cloth feminine pads. Having the reusable pads means that the girls don’t miss school during their menstrual periods. A simple solution that I would not have considered a year ago!

Sarah Simwaka, age 13, is in 7th grade at Phalasito Primary School. She is one of 1,282 girls who have each received at least ten feminine pads (called “fem pads” in Malawi) from Hope for Relief.

An orientation at Phalasito primary school shows the girls how to use and wash the reusable fem pads.

The road has not been easy for Sarah. “I am a second-born daughter in a family of five. My father died when I was six years old and mother died when l was nine.” Sarah and her siblings are now being raised by her grandfather who provides food and a place to sleep but cannot afford their education costs. Sarah used to do small jobs to support herself. “Each time after classes, l used to go to the nearby forest and fetch firewood. l would sell that to get money for pads, school uniform, and school supplies. Thanks to Hope for Relief Organization, now I am free.” Sarah is now happily attending school.

She is one of 1,282 girls who have received fem pads from Hope for Relief.

In addition to the fem pads, Sarah also receives emotional support through Hope for Relief. She told one of the Hope for Relief counselors that her family was hoping to arrange a marriage for her, so that they could get the dowry. The legal age of marriage in Malawi is 18, so it would be illegal for her to marry now. The counselor encouraged Sarah to report any marriage arrangements or family challenges to the school leaders. The head teachers, who are respected and have influence with community members, have promised to watch out for Sarah.

SIA is very honored be part of this holistic support of girls in Malawi. By listening to community solutions, we are supporting simple and innovative ways of empowering girls.

Tanya admiring some of the fem pads made by Salome in Malawi.

Tanya meeting with Richard and Hastings, two leaders of Hope for Relief. The organization is youth-led!

 

Why does it matter?

Why does it matter?

Droughts. Climate change. Tough farming conditions. Human rights violations. Self-expression denied. This week, two news stories highlighted how important the work of Spirit in Action is to combat these devastating realities.

New York Times: Loss of Fertile Land in Kenya

“More than in any other region of the world, people in Africa live off the land. There are relatively few industrial or service jobs here. Seventy percent of Africa’s population makes a living through agriculture, higher than on any other continent, the World Bank says.

“But as the population rises, with more siblings competing for their share of the family farm, the slices are getting thinner. In many parts of Africa, average farm size is just an acre or two, and after repeated divisions of the same property, some people are left trying to subsist on a sliver of a farm that is not much bigger than a tennis court.

“Fast-growing populations mean that many African families can’t afford to let land sit fallow and replenish. They have to take every inch of their land and farm or graze it constantly. This steadily lowers the levels of organic matter in the soil, making it difficult to grow crops.

“In many areas, the soil is so dried out and exhausted that there is little solace even when the prayed-for rains finally come. The ground is as hard as concrete and the rain just splashes off, like a hose spraying a driveway.” (Link to full article.)

SIA Partners in Action

SIA partners like CIFROD Kenya are helping to address the challenge of concrete-like soil. When I visited many CIFORD gardens last month in Maua, Kenya, I saw how CIFORD’s sustainable agriculture training helps farmers to break up the soil, replenish the nutrients with manure, and reduce water usage. (Read my blog post “How to garden in a drought” here.)

One of the grateful farmers we visited in Kenya. After implementing the sustainable agriculture techniques he learned from CIFORD, he noticed now much more he can grow.

The Manyamula COMSIP Cooperative also trains members to use manure and compost, and to intercrop their crops by alternating rows of beans and corn. The corn pulls nitrogen from the soil, and the beans help add it back into the soil. This can improve the soil and also increase the farm yields.

BBC: Mass arrests of gay people in Nigeria

“More than 40 men have been arrested in Nigeria over the weekend for performing homosexual acts, police say. Nigerian newspaper Punch reports that the police raided a hotel in Lagos State on Saturday afternoon and says the hotel was cordoned off while the investigation was carried out.

“Homosexual acts are punishable by up to 14 years in jail in Nigeria, while gay marriage and displays of same-sex affection are also banned.” (Link to full article.)

The situation is similar in Uganda, where gay and lesbian people have no legal protection and there are laws banning gay marriage. Extreme social stigma and threat of physical violence means that it takes great courage to be out as LGBT.

Spirit in Action is in the early stages of partnering with Universal Love Ministries (ULM), a grassroots organization to end violence against women and LGBT people in Uganda. ULM delivers seminars in schools, churches, and communities creating awareness on human rights for women, children and sexual minorities.

I see the work of ULM as an important part of SIA’s mission to help everyone know that they are spiritual beings and that we all hold the divine within us.

Sharon Kukunda shares about why she works with ULM in Uganda:

These two news stories remind me that the work we are supporting is not trivial. It is about life and death. SIA’s partners are boldly helping people live better lives, with enough food to eat, and the right to be safe. Thank you for joining us in supporting this work.

Grants underway and I’m on my way!

Grants underway and I’m on my way!

We sent out the latest round of grant funds last month and the community projects are already well underway!

Women’s Group Curio Shop

The women of the Namaiyana Women’s Self-Help Group completed their roadside jewelry shop just in time for tourism season! This was the first major construction project undertaken by these women, who are jewelers and members of the Samburu tribe in central Kenya. The first SIA grant was not quite enough to finish the shop and so they asked for a small additional grant to be able to add the final touches. Just a few weeks after receiving the additional $500 grant, the building is ready to go! Look how beautiful it turned out! Supporting these woman was definitely a “smart risk.”

Poultry House Construction

The folks at the Matungu Community Development Charity were eager to get started! Soon after receiving the grant funds they were already hard at work building the new poultry house in western Kenya. Community members worked together to make the bricks and built up the walls. Group leader, Vincent Atitwa wrote, “The poultry house is under construction and in particular we are working hard to lead families and community out of malnutrition and poverty once more.”

They hope that the building will be completed by June 1st. They already have a supplier for the chicks and they will have them delivered soon. The profits from the poultry project will serve as a loan fund for the table banking and low-interest loan program!

I’m on my way!

I leave today for a month-long trip in eastern Africa. After a short vacation, I will meet with all the SIA Small Business Fund partners for a conference and training workshop in Malawi. We will have coordinators from Uganda, Kenya, and Malawi there to discuss and evaluate our program. The manual is printed and ready to be packed!

I’ll try to share my experience with you along the way and post what I can here on the blog, and on Facebook and Instagram. Thank you for your prayers!

Not a corporate board…

Not a corporate board…

The Spirit in Action Board of Directors met over the weekend to approve new grants, receive reports and review our program, and also pray for our partners and donors. We also joyfully welcomed Wendy and Terry Silverthorn of Camino, CA to the board! They are longtime supporters of SIA and are happy to get more involved with our work.

I bet it won’t surprise you to learn that the SIA board does not operate like your average corporate board! After reviewing each grant proposal, we take a few moments of silence to reflect and listen in prayer. Then, we each share our thoughts about the proposal and any guidance that came to us in the silence. This listening prayer and consensus model really does help the meetings flow more smoothly.

New Grants!

Over the course of the day the board approved some very exciting new grants! We funded 23 new Small Business Fund grants, and also grants for a LGBT workshop in Uganda, a savings and loans cooperative in Kenya, a bead work and carpet-making workshop for women in Nairobi, and more! Some of these grassroots organizations are for long-time partners, and others are new to SIA. In all cases we remember Del Anderson’s commitment to building relationships, and his openness to sharing knowledge with each other, and learning what we can about poverty reduction and local needs from our partners.

At the end of the day, and before meeting up for dinner, several of us took a walk in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. After the intensity of the meeting, I reveled in the stillness of those ancient trees and the lush greenness of the resilient undergrowth.

Me next to a giant redwood tree!

During the meeting, board member Barbara Deal shared about her experience of meeting Mother Theresa many years ago. Mother Theresa remarked that the reason she served others, including the most destitute, was that it was an opportunity to “serve Jesus in all his most distressing and glorious disguises.” At Spirit in Action, as we serve alongside our wonderful partners, we also have this opportunity to co-create with Jesus.

The Faces of Kenya’s Future

The Faces of Kenya’s Future

“Our greatest national resource is the minds of our children.” ― Walt Disney

Spirit in Action is investing in this natural resource by supporting students at Samuel and Rhoda Teimuge’s Samro School in Kenya. A SIA Community Grant in November will pay for school fees and lunch for four students, and also cover the tuition and board for eight boarding students. Samro is not only a place to learn, it is also a loving environment which gives the students hope and builds their self-esteem.

Marion Jelagat graduated from Samro School three years ago and is now studying at Kessup Girls High School, where Rhoda Teimue also went to high school! It is a good school and Marion does well in her academics. In her extracurricular activities she does public speaking. Last semester she was one of the best speakers in her county. She is also a Narrative Speaker and performed the best poem in her county. The poem was entitled, “Education is the only weapon that can fight the society.” About 2,400 people listened to her and you can imagine the impact!

Faith Jepkoech is in pre-kindergarten. She was abandoned by her family and has been welcomed into another family near Samro School. The family who is caring for her is also struggling to provide for their other children, and so they requested that Faith board at Samro School for the term. The SIA grant is paying for her studies.

Greflo Koech is in 4th Grade. His mother passed away and his father is struggling to take care of his four other children.

Valentine Jepkoech is in pre-kindergarten. Her family has five children and they are struggling to provide for their basic needs. They are unable to pay the school fees.

Hariet Jebotip is in 3rd Grade. She comes from a family of five children. Her parents are very poor and they struggle to provide food and other basic needs.

Paul Karanja is now in 7th Grade. We have supported Paul in his studies at Samro for 4th years! He has a dream to be an engineer and earn enough so that he can buy a piece of land for his mother and build her a permanent house.

We wish all the students at Samro School a good year! May they grow and develop into bright and caring youth!

Bonus: I found this blog post about the Kenyan school system very helpful! Do you know what Middle Class means? It’s not what you think…

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