Training leads to jobs in Nairobi

Training leads to jobs in Nairobi

“This is an opportunity for me to change my life from idling and gossiping around in the community. I am happy that the number of cases involving me with other women will now reduce with this lifetime opportunity to gain embroidery and tailoring skills. I would like to specialize in school outfits like track suits and girl’s skirts. Thank you so much Progressive Volunteers.’’

Rosemary Ochieng is 19 years old and dropped out of school after elementary school. She lives in the Ruaraka community – one of the poorest areas of Kenya’s capital city, Nairobi. There aren’t a lot of good opportunities for women like Rosemary to turn their lives around. The opportunity that Rosemary credits for changing her life is attending the Mathare Dressmaking Training Centre. The centre runs classes for four months with skilled training in tailoring, machine embroidery, and fashion design.

Rosemary is not the only one to benefit. She is one of 168 women and 13 men who have completed the training course.

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Trainees gather around a table to practice their sewing.

Training leads to jobs

Of the 181 trainees, 124 have managed to secure employment with Ruaraka Clothing Industries, a large employer in the area. In most cases these women and youth are working as skilled machine operators, meaning that the classes directly opened this employment opportunity for them. There are also 27 trainees who are working for independent dressmaking businesses. Four more are remaining in the Dressmaking Centre to help with training and management.

George is one of the instructors and is a skilled machine operator.

George is one of the instructors and is a skilled machine operator.

With a Community Grant from Spirit in Action, the Mathare Dressmaking Training Centre rented a place to hold the trainings. They also bought high-tech sewing and embroidery machines, and hired instructors to develop the training curriculum.

The Centre continues to improve their offerings by changing as they learn from each training cycle. They found that many women were missing the evening classes because of family obligations. For the next round of classes, they will focus on morning and afternoon classes to better accommodate the busy schedules of their students.

The training team is also looking into ways to make their program more sustainable and they are considering a Sharing the Gift component. This would encourage the trained students to give back to the Centre, especially after they have been able to secure steady jobs.

Congratulations to the Mathare Dressmaking and Training Centre for truly empowering poor women and giving them hope for the future.

 

For Sustainable Futures. A business 12 years later.

For Sustainable Futures. A business 12 years later.

This Saturday we will celebrate 20 years of Spirit in Action. Twenty years ago, in February of 1996, Del and Lucile Anderson, twelve Board Members, and Marsha Johnson (as administrative coordinator), met to officially form Spirit in Action in order to “carry on Del’s loving ministry.”

“Spirit in Action. For Sustainable Futures” declares the heading of the recorded minutes from that meeting. Sustainability has always been and continues to be a focus for our grant projects. We want to support programs, schools, businesses, and social movements that will last long after we send a grant.

In Malawi, this goal of long-term impact is a reality. Since 2004, Spirit in Action has supported 122 family/business groups in Manymaula Village through our Small Business Fund and most of those enterprises are still operating today!

Mulla and Mollen with their six grandchildren, in front of their renovated home.

Mulla and Mollen with their six grandchildren, in front of their renovated home.

Twelve years ago, Mulla Tembo and Mollen Mtonga started Mulla’s Livestock Production with a $150 grant. Their lives, and the lives of their six children and six grandchildren, have dramatically improved since receiving this grant and learning to run a business. They raise pigs, goats, and oxen. And they are able to use the oxen to plough their fields, a big luxury in rural Malawi. 

Mulla and Mollen happily report that they are now food secure. This means they have enough maize to last through the hungry season between planting and harvest. They have built a house with tin roofing sheets, replacing the “very poor housing structure” that they had before joining the Small Business Fund program.

Mulla with two of their six cattle in a yoke for ploughing.

Mulla with two of their six cattle in a yoke for ploughing.

Mulla with their plough in the maize field.

Mulla with their plough in the maize field.

Besides the fourteen family members that have benefitted and continue to benefit from this business, the family was one of the first groups to participate in Sharing the Gift. They offered a piglet to Winkly Mahowe. (Read the amazing story of Winkly and the gift of the pig!) Winkly and his family took this pig and used it to improve their lives and livelihoods. They also continue to raise pigs to this day. In 2014, I saw their full chicken coops. That’s another 14+ people who have been positively impacted by that initial grant.

And Winkly also Shared the Gift by giving a piglet to another family. And on and on it goes…

This Saturday, let us really celebrate that Spirit in Action is living up to our founding mission. Stories of Mulla and Mollen, Winkly and his family, and each of the 122 business groups in Manyamula are real proof that Spirit in Action is indeed helping people to realize the dream of a more sustainable (and prosperous) future.

Jane raises chickens and pigs with her husband, Winkly. They have built a new house with the business profits.

Jane raises chickens and pigs with her husband, Winkly. They have built a new house with the business profits.

Meet SIA Partners Face-to-Face this June

Meet SIA Partners Face-to-Face this June

Samuel and Rhoda Teimuge hosted me during both of my visits to Kenya, 2011 and 2014. Their campus in the rural outskirts of Eldoret is simultaneously a vibrant hub and a peaceful retreat. Friendly people, working as teachers, gardeners, house parents, and cooks welcomed me, showing me the sustainable agriculture training garden (with fish ponds, compost piles, mushroom greenhouses, and more), the elementary school and daycare centre, meeting hall and dining room, guest huts, cow and chicken pens, and the children’s home (run by Empowering Lives International).

Touring the Samro School gardens. This kale will be used in the school lunches.

Touring the Samro School kitchen gardens. This kale will be used in the school lunches.

Evidence of Spirit in Action was all over the centre – SIA helped build the first school classrooms (they were some of SIA’s first grants!) and the Ukweli Training Centre farms were conceptualized by Del and Samuel. The encouraging messages on classroom walls seem to echo Del and Lucile’s words of hope. And yet, I credit the many successes of the school and training centre to the dedication and leadership of Samuel and Rhoda. They embody Spirit in ACTION. 

When I visited the Teimuges in 2011 with the SIA Small Business Fund Coordinators, Samuel told us how SIA encourages people to act, not just talk, “You know many times people talk, talk, talk, talk, but the Spirit in Action business plan starts from where you are, so instead of talking you do something that will really help, not only to your family, but also to others.”

Honored Guests

The Teimuges have been such wonderful hosts to me and other SIA friends and so perfectly represent the aims of SIA and Del that it is with great pleasure that we will welcome them to Oakland on June 25th as honored guests as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of Spirit in Action’s founding.We hope that you will take this opportunity to meet face-to-face some of SIA’s partners and hear their stories of serving the youth and working to reduce poverty in Kenya. It is sure to be an inspiring afternoon.

For more details about the event, click here. Or email Tanya for more information or to RSVP.

Encouraging words in the Samro School computer lab.

Encouraging words in the Samro School computer lab.

"We have seen that seed of faith and vision grow, which were powerful gifts from Del and Jim [Thomas]," Rhoda told me when I visited Samro School in Eldoret, Kenya in 2014.

“We have seen that seed of faith and vision grow, which were powerful gifts from Del and Jim [Thomas],” Rhoda told me when I visited Samro School in Eldoret, Kenya in 2014.

A peaceful moment of stillness with the Teimuges, in the midst of a crazy travel schedule (2014).

A peaceful moment of stillness with the Teimuges, in the midst of a crazy travel schedule (2014).

P.S. For a fun travel story, read my Kenyan, muddy-road, adventure tale!

P.P.S. I’m working on a timeline of SIA’s 20 years and I realized that I have been writing weekly blog posts since June 2010! Wow! Thanks for reading!

All the best of Spirit in Action in one report!

All the best of Spirit in Action in one report!

Paying-it-forward, positive change in a high-poverty neighborhood, knowledge sharing, local leadership, and savings group formation – this update from our local coordinator in Nairobi, Kenya highlights so many of the best part of Spirit in Action.

Here is the exciting report directly from Wambui Nguyo:

Spirit in Action still continues to be a beacon of hope for the Korogocho people. With SIA’s help of the Small Business Fund many families continue to experience a different positive lifestyle. Many lives have been transformed, children can go to school, and they can eat better and even dress better.

Korogocho (called Koch for short) has been in the spotlight in the past for many negative aspects. Crime and unemployment rates are high. Basic services and sanitation are scarce. But the beneficiaries of the Small Business Fund have a lot to be thankful for.

There are 27 groups/families in Koch that have been funded by SIA. The first one was in 2013.

Ann, one of the SBF group leaders, prepares food and sells it to workers along the roadside.

Ann, one of the SBF group leaders, prepares food and sells it to workers along the roadside.

Among the 27 groups, two of them are Muslims. Amid the tensions within the faith divisions, the people have found time and place to spend together in prayer.  As Josephine [who is a local leader and who works with Wambui] puts it, “we all understand we come from different backgrounds, that we come from different religions, and from different lifestyle and upbringing. What brings us together is the enormous poverty that we encounter. That brings us together. Poverty bites really hard. We all know we worship the same God. Some call him Allah while we call him God. We usually say the same prayer because we were created by him.”

A plan is underway for Sharing the Gift. The beneficiaries of the Small Business Fund have each contributed and they are hoping to support another group to set up a business of their choice with $150. This will empower another family and also give them a chance to give back to the community.

Unlike in the rural village, where families live in their own piece of land regardless of the poverty level, Koch is different.  Here, families have to rent out houses. Because of rising standard of living, the rent can go up and then families are forced to move to a cheaper house. Luckily, only one group has left Korogocho area because of rising costs.

Chairs arranged for a meeting of the Small Business Fund groups in Koch. The meet at least once a month all together.

Chairs arranged for a meeting of the Small Business Fund groups in Koch. The meet at least once a month all together.

Plans to start a village savings project are underway! A concept note written by Josephine says, “We intend to initiate the Korogocho Women Economic Fund where women from the community can access flexible loan and flexible repayment model to start or expand their businesses. This initiative will be registered with the government and we shall use a model known as the village banking model.”

Canaan Gondwe from Malawi [Small Business Fund local coordinator and leader of his community’s savings and investment cooperative] has that experience and he can be very useful in helping to start it up. He wrote to inspire the team in Koch and said, “now, when people form a village savings team, it acts like a buffer. It cushions the members in times of eventualities. So I encourage you to unite and have one purpose which is economic empowerment.”

Will you be able to attend our 20th Anniversary Celebration on June 25th in Oakland? Click here for more information and RSVP to me at tanya@spiritinaction.org. See you there!

4 photos, 4 stories

4 photos, 4 stories

These are the faces of Spirit in Action. Each photo captures just one moment and represents a much larger story of struggle, success, and joy.

Passionate Volunteer. (Pictured above) Dennis Kiprop with his wife, Nancy, and their son, Timo. Dennis volunteers with SIA as a Small Business Fund Coordinators in Eldoret, Kenya. He has a degree in business administration and is passionate about helping people prepare their business plans and start a successful small business. He assisted me in developing a opportunity and risk assessment for new business groups to use in their planning.

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Bridging Spiritual and Economic Barriers. Madina sells shoes with her sister and mother along the roadside in Nairobi, Kenya. With the profit, her sister was able to go see the eye doctor. They are one of several Muslim families in the Small Business Fund program in Nairobi. Christian and Muslim Small Business Fund groups have formed a savings cooperative together and they meet weekly to contribute savings and give small loans to members. (Read more about the SBF groups in Nairobi.)

DSC04515_1024Building a Dream. Before connecting with SIA, Paul, a shoemaker in rural Malawi, took a loan from micro-lending institutions in Mzuzu, about 15 miles away. With the high interest rate and short loan period, he was unable to repay the loan and he lost his collateral to the lender. Since receiving a Small Business Fund $150 grant in 2006, I have witnessed Paul go from one success to another. When I visited in 2011, Paul showed me his shoe repair stall in the local market. He told me of his dream to build a house and showed me the few iron sheets he had already purchased. In 2014, I visited him at his house! It was complete with cement floors, a tin roof, and sturdy brick walls. In his smile, I see the joy and pride of a dream fulfilled. (Read more about Paul’s journey here.)

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Long-lasting Impact. Steria Lungu, a widow in Manyamula Village, Malawi, used her $150 Small Business Fund grant to start a donut shop. She started her business in 2010 and it is still thriving! In 2011, Steria began saving her profits to buy iron roofing sheets to replace her leaky thatch. Today she has a new roof and when I visited, she was so proud to show me her family’s store of maize, “We now have no problem with food.”

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