The booming renewable energy market in Uganda

The booming renewable energy market in Uganda

A briquette fuel making initiative, organized by the Ugandan grassroots organization LUWODEA, is creating hundreds of jobs in their community. They used a SIA grant to buy a briquette production machine, which takes plant waste and compresses it to form a highly efficient fuel source. LUWODEA also formed a women’s cooperative to work together and share profits! (Read more about the cooperative here.)

A trainer with LUWODEA meets with the women from the briquette cooperative.

So far the production is a great success! Mrs. Sharon, one of the group leaders, shared, “We are happy to report that the beneficiaries and other groups are now making their own briquettes to be sold at local markets and to hotels, restaurants, schools, and bakeries around Kamuli Township. In last few days of Christmas preparation, we were able to produce 1,300 briquettes. This is equivalent to 238 pounds of fuel.”

The briquettes can be made out of a variety of locally available waste materials like coffee husks, banana peals and charcoal-dust. Reusing these materials as fuel saves trees from being cut down. Additionally, the briquettes have a high heat content and burn for longer times, with less smoke, compared to wood fuel.

Growing Interest and Expanding Businesses

Looking around the village, LUWODEA is impressed with how many people have already started using and selling briquette fuel. “Currently, the local demand is not able to be met by the LUWODEA women, so we have been promoting and encouraging many other people in the surrounding communities to engage in briquette production as a potential business to help fight extreme poverty in homes.”

Mrs. Sharon reports that a Mr. Nelson, “had abandoned his firewood selling business after three weeks of successive losses. He had many obstacles in conducting his firewood business since most of his clients are resorting to buying briquettes from women working with LUWODEA.” Firewood can’t compare with the more affordable and more efficient briquettes!

The LUWODEA briquette radio show also inspired Moses to start his own business. This year, Moses hopes to be able to employ 10 youth to help with production. Moses writes, “Thank you Spirit in Action for not providing us with fish, but teaching us how to catch fish. I now feel self-empowered and am using realizing fully my potential to fight poverty in my home.”

#GivingTuesday: “Whatever is honorable”

#GivingTuesday: “Whatever is honorable”

“Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.” – Philippians 4:8

Today is #givingtuesday in the U.S. After a bustle of purchases and shops, it is a day to do as the early Christians were called to do and reflect on the good, praiseworthy, pleasing, and commendable things going on around us. It’s also a call to support those true works of justice in the world. (Click on the picture to zoom in.)

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Thank you for being part of this good work!

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Building friendships as they work

Building friendships as they work

With a grant from Spirit in Action, LUWODEA, a grassroots organization in Kamuli, Uganda, purchased high-tech equipment for making biomass fuel briquettes. Earlier this month 160 rural women attended learned to make this cheap, reliable cooking fuel. Instead of having to collect wood (resulting in deforestation), they now are making their own fuel by compacting green waste.

“We are so happy to report that women enjoyed the training and they have started off very well producing briquettes for home use. They are also selling off the surplus briquettes for income earning,” reports Sharon Mudondo, LUWODEA’s coordinator.

Agatha Mubula cooks dinner using the smokeless briquettes.

Agatha Mubula cooks dinner using the smokeless briquettes.

Don’t touch that dial!

As I reviewed Sharon’s report, I was fascinated to learn that LUWODEA is promoting their new product on the radio!

“We held a 15-minute radio talk show at local radio Ssebo, in Kamuli town. We were able to respond to questions from community members about briquette fuel as a business and a environmental conservation initiative. This gave us a chance to create massive awareness about the project and also inform the general public about prices and where they can get the briquettes made by our beneficiaries.”

They talk about how the briquettes burn faster, last longer, and are more efficient compared with traditional wood charcoal fuel. The briquettes are also cheaper!

“Our area being remote, the most common means of communication to masses is radio,” explains Sharon. “About 90% of rural families own small radios, so it is easy to listen to news and other programs like the briquette talk show. We have found the program very effective in terms of creating awareness. It also is helping us to reach more villages than we would if we had to do house-to-house outreach.”

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Women making briquettes in the market place. Biomass materials are pressed to create a dense pellet.

“We smile as we share challenges”

The LUWODEA team report that the women who are diligent about making and selling the briquettes can earn $3-8 per day! This income benefit the family in tangible ways. They can eat more meals per day, and pay for school fees. We learn from the testimony of Nora Karule, that the project also has intangible benefits:

“This briquette program comes with health advantages. These briquettes are smokeless and my children have not been sick in the past one and half months. This also means I can save more money because before I would spend such money that I earned on their treatment. I also find it interesting working with my fellow group mates at the briquette center. We are able to talk freely about issues in our families and even make jokes. We smile as we share challenges and other life experiences we face as women.”

Celebrating International Day of the Girl

Celebrating International Day of the Girl

Today is the UN’s International Day of the Girl and at Spirit in Action we are honored to partner with many wonderful women who are working to improve the lives of girls and women in their community. We are part of a large network of positive change! Today I highlight three inspiring SIA female leaders:

Margaret Ikiara, Director of CIFORD, Kenya

Empowering girls and fighting the practice of female genital mutilation. (Read about her SIA connection.)

Today is International Day of the Girl Child!

We’re proud to work with CIFORD, who fight against the harmful practice…

Posted by Child.org on Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Naomi Ayot, Small Business Fund Coordinator, Uganda

For her day job, Naomi is the Program Manager of Gender & Human Rights at Action for Community Development – Uganda (Read about her SIA connection.)

#WEaretheLEADERS: If we want to change the status quo in development, recognize grassroots leadership. BIG YES! Thank…

Posted by One World Children’s Fund on Monday, October 10, 2016

Wambui Nguyo, Small Business Fund Coordinator, Kenya

A peace-builder and trainer with Initiatives of Change, Kenya. (Read about her SIA connection.)

screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-3-00-01-pmFrom the article: “We are often too afraid to take the lead because of fear of the unknown,’ Susan commented. Before the end of the three days training, she had already taken the initiative to reconcile with one of her long time rivals. She even bought an item from her rival’s shop- something she had avoided for a long time. She was amazed at how well her enemy responded to reconciliation after such a long time. ‘Today I have learnt to let every good thing begin where I am before I can pass it on to others. Even my dad, who caused our family so much pain – after selling our family land and misusing all the money drinking. Today I forgive him and will make peace with him.” (Read the full article.)

See what a Kenyan viral video looks like!

See what a Kenyan viral video looks like!

You never know what video or meme might go viral. Sometimes it’s dumping a bucket of ice water on your head. Sometimes it’s an adorable baby sea otter. And in Kenya, sometimes it’s a street boy singing a popular gospel song!

Tredy Bradly was filmed singing a song by the famous Kenyan gospel singer, Mercy Masika. It was uploaded to Facebook and people loved it! “What talent!” they gushed. Soon there was a campaign to get Mercy to recognize the boy. Then he was adopted by a Kenyan guardian and has earned a full scholarship to a private school in Nairobi!

See what all the fuss is about:

Now enjoy the original song, watched over 3 million times (including 3 times by me…)!

This “urban gospel” song is a song of love and praise to God. The chorus says,

“And I cant’ keep myself from speaking of your goodness.
And it is not bragging, you have done me well.”

Amen.

South Sudanese Refugees

In more sober news from East Africa the number of of refugees fleeing the violence in South Sudan has reached 1 million this week, according to the UN. After a ceasefire in South Sudan in 2015, there was a renewed round of fighting in the capital this July. The refugees, mostly women and children, are seeking asylum in Uganda, Ethiopia, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Central African Republic. Uganda is now generously hosting more refugees than in any time in their history, including about 370,000 South Sudanese.

Here is a short news story with more details.

Let us be prayerful for the refugees, those welcoming them, and those still fighting for power. May there be peace in South Sudan. May we find more space for compassion in this world. Let there be peace on earth, and let it begin with me.

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