That second chance that makes all the difference

That second chance that makes all the difference

After years in a difficult marriage, Loveness Nkhoma found herself divorced, back at home, and unsure how to support herself and her three children. Canaan Gondwe, the local SIA Small Business Fund (SBF) coordinator in Manyamula Village, Malawi, recruited her to join the SBF program and start a new business. She quickly grasped the new business concepts and was a big help encouraging the other business leaders in her cohort.

In April 2015, Loveness received her $100 grant and opened a small shop in the village. She ordered vegetables, tomatoes, and other wholesale goods in bulk and then repackaged them into smaller quantities.

Loveness with her repackaged goods for sale.

It’s been two years and the business continues to provide all the basic needs for the family of four! Loveness has saved $69 and reinvested almost $200 back into the shop. She is able to pay school fees for her sons Adam (4th grade) and Raphael (5th grade) and has enough food for her 4-year-old daughter. The demand for their goods has been higher than expected! Loveness bought three goats with the profit. The goats will give milk and manure, in addition to meat.

When Canaan went to visit Loveness and check on her business, she was quick to say that she is happy with her progress and is thankful to SIA for giving her a chance. She is positive about her future and she feels secured and stable, a big change from how she felt right after her divorce!

Loveness with the three goats she bought with her SBF grocery profits.

Spelling “SIA” to Raise Money for Small Businesses!

Thank you to Joshua Brooks for running a half-marathon last weekend to raise money for the SIA Small Business Fund! He spelled S-I-A as he ran and raised $720, enough for almost five new small businesses. Check out his route here (or by clicking on the runner below). Then click the arrow play button on the bottom of the map to see his spelling in action! Thank you to all who contributed to the campaign!

Entrepreneurs in Nairobi: “We feel resurrected”

Entrepreneurs in Nairobi: “We feel resurrected”

These men and women, chosen to receive SIA Small Business Fund grants, are living in the rough conditions in the informal settlements around Nairobi. They and their families are living without running water or adequate toilet facilities. Structures are made tin pieces and are packed together very closely. Rain turns dirt roads and floors into muddy messes.

And yet, with the chance to start her own business and to provide for her family, one of the new entrepreneurs in Nairobi said that she feels like she is ‘resurrected’ and ‘like other people’ now.

Here are more success stories from the latest Small Business Fund cohort in Korogocho, Nairobi:

  • Mutinda, selling shoes: He feels very confident because can provide food for his family. All his children can go to school and his family can even afford better medical care. Writing is a challenge for Mutinda, but his business skills are excellent!
  • Rebecca, cooking chapatti: She is now her own boss, leaving her old workplace where she also cooked chapatti. Initially, she was selling a few packets per day, but now she can sell in bundles (a big packet of twelve chapatti). Her children still go to school and eat well. She was also able to repair holes in the roof of her rented house. Before, she would be waiting forever for the owner to do it.

Phoebe explaining a point to other entrepreneurs

  • Nelly, making soaps: She was making five liters of soap at a time, and repacking it in smaller quantities to sell. Now, she makes 60 liters and has a much better market. Three people have benefitted from this business and she is able to take her son to a better school. She can afford medical care and is grateful to SIA.
  • Phoebe, selling fabric: She is so proud to be able to send her son to a boarding school out of Nairobi County! Five people benefitted from the business, but the best thing that ever happened to her is sending her son to boarding school just like ‘other people’!
  • Kezziah, selling vegetables: Her profit was more than predicted! Besides reinvesting 20% in the business, she is able to keep 10% for herself. She is able to pay school fees for all her children. She is especially proud that she can pay for her daughter to attend high school. Her family also eats better than before.

So far, SIA has supported 33 businesses in the Korogocho slum in Nairobi. Josephine, one of the SIA local mentors, plans to meet with all 33 groups and register themselves under the Deputy President’s program for women’s groups!

Improving life in the informal settlement (L to R): Dorcas (who helps with record-keeping), Kezziah, Mutinda, Phoebe and Josephine (local mentor).

A second chance for Sylvia

A second chance for Sylvia

It’s not easy being divorced in Malawi. Three years ago, Sylvia S.’s husband left her and ran off to South Africa, leaving her (now age 33) alone with her two daughters (ages 7 and 12). Sylvia had no visible source of income. Previously, Sylvia had relied on her husband for income. She spent her time caring for the children and their home. Suddenly, she was without her husband and without a job, and without money for even soap or food.

She didn’t have a lot, but Sylvia did have some experience as a hair dresser. It is the goal of the Small Business Fund to reach people like Sylvia. Our local coordinators recruit families who are well below the poverty line and who also have some skills that they will be able to leverage with the $150 grant. (Read more about how we choose business groups.)

New Beginnings

Sylvia used the first grant installment of $100 to rent a shop in the Manyamula market. She also bought things like hair weaves, shampoo, and other hair products that would appeal to her new customers. The Debbie and Nomsa Hair Salon (named after her daughters) was open for business!

Sylvia with a customer. She has a style chart and many options for extensions to braid into her customer’s hair.

Just three months later, the shop was so busy that Sylvia needed to hire an assistant to help with the hair braiding and styling services. She used some of her profit to buy a new hair dryer so that she could expand the services at her shop.

Sylvia is now earning her own income and is able to provide for her family. She has enough money for food and to send her two daughters to school.

In a letter from Canaan Gondwe, our local coordinator who recruited, trained, and is mentoring Sylvia, he reports that, “Sylvia is grateful to SIA for the transformation in her life, and most times you find her smiling.”

Sparking hope this Christmas!

Sparking hope this Christmas!

Pictured above are members of the Namayiana Women Group. The group is based in Archer’s Post, Samburu County, Kenya, and has a membership of 25 women. The women make beaded jewelry and accessories, wooden artifacts, and souvenirs for tourists on safari. The Self-Help Group received a grant from Spirit in Action to build a roadside shop. Through the shop they will generate income for their families and provide assistance for more girls to attend school.

The store will be located close to the entrance of the famed Samburu National Reserve. The women are prepared to take control of their financial situation in a collective effort to improve the lives of their families and community at large. This new business venture comes from their realization that self-employment creates self-empowerment. The decision to start their own business was sparked by their community’s participation at Pastoralist Child Foundation workshops and learning about the importance of formal education. The construction will start next week.

Merry Christmas!

We are honored to spark hope and support the self-empowerment of these women! This Christmas, let us celebrate the good that can happen when groups of committed individuals come together to work for change.

Merry Christmas from Spirit in Action and our international partners!

Encouraging Updates

Encouraging Updates

A family business in Eldoret, Kenya

Purity and her son, Cyril, started a milk and doughnut business (a winning combination!) with a SIA Small Business Grant in 2015. This week, local coordinator Dennis Kiprop went to visit them and was pleased to see that Cyril had already sold out by 10am. Cyril shares his excitement, “I am grateful for SIA for coming to us in time, we have been so encouraged in our family and we have expanded the business.”

Cyril with milk jugs attached to the back of his motorbike. He works with his mother to support the family.

Cyril with milk jugs attached to the back of his motorbike. He works with his mother to support the family.

Supporting Business Expansion

The SIA Board met over the weekend. We took time to pray for each of our dedicated partners throughout Africa. We rededicated ourselves to continue our work of empowerment and encouragement. One of the newly approved grant projects is a jewelry shop. The Namaiyana Women’s Self-Help Group is in Archer’s Post, Samburu County, Kenya. The 25 members make beautiful, handmade beaded jewelry and accessories, wooden artifacts, and suvenirs for tourists on safari.

Board Member Kathleen King was pleased to support this application. “This is exactly the kind of project that we like to support. The women have already learned the skill and Spirit in Action funds can help them get to the next step to support themselves and their families.”

Young artisan showing off the beautiful beaded jewelry.

Young artisan showing off the beautiful beaded jewelry.

Receiving Prayers of Peace

“We are praying for you in the wake of your elections,” is a phrase I have written many times in my nine years with Spirit in Action. Elections in Uganda, Kenya, Nigeria have called me to prayer. This week, I am on the receiving end of these messages. One of our partners in Kenya wrote, “I am also praying for you for peace, understanding, and respect in the wake of your new president.

I remember that when in Kenya, everyone I met was so proud of President Obama, a man with Kenyan heritage. Many Kenyans remarked how impressed they were that the United States had elected someone who was so different. May we receive these prayers and be grateful for our amazing global SIA community.

“Every moment is an organizing opportunity, every person a potential activist, every minute a chance to change the world.”
~ Dolores Huerta

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